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AUSTRALIA’S INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNISED SHORT FILM FESTIVAL, FLICKERFEST, COMMENCES JANUARY 6, SCREENING 100 WORKS—”THE MOST INNOVATIVE, PROVOCATIVE AND ENTERTAINING SHORT FILMS” SELECTED FROM A RECORD 2,173 ENTRIES.

The 2012 festival features international and Australian short films, short documentaries and Greenflicks—films focused on environmental issues. A new addition is Flickerup, “a competition open to student filmmakers from primary to high school age, or filmmakers under 18 years of age from across Australia.”

Competition is a strong component of the festival, not least because the Flickerfest Award for Best Film and the Yoram Gross Award for Best Animation are Academy Award Accredited. Four films from the 2011 program went on to be nominated for Oscars, including The Lost Thing (directors Andrew Ruhemann, Shaun Taun, Australia), which won the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film and the God of Love (Luke Matheny, US) which won the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film.

The 2012 Flickerfest international program includes French director Thomas Cailey’s 25-minute comedy Paris Shanghai which attracted audience awards in France and Pjotr Sapegin’s 13-minute animation The Last Norwegian Troll (Norway) about the challenge of having to preserve something you don’t like (Best Narrative Short, Ottawa Festival, Best Animated Short, Fantastic Festival, Las Vegas).

Australian films include writer-director Zak Hilditch and producer Liz Kearney’s apocalyptic drama, Transmission, focused on a stressed father and daughter relationship in the Western Australian desert; Rodd Rathjen’s comedy The Stranger (which had its first screenings in the 2011 Revelation and Melbourne International Film Festivals); Robert Stephenson’s animation Paris Lakes, described in the Annecy International Animation Festival’s Politically Incorrect program as “A promotion for a new suburb packed with the latest amenities and faux European tastes to satisfy the Australian appetite for easy living”; Nash Edgerton’s Bear, which screened at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, co-written by Edgerton and David Michod (Animal Kingdom) and including Warwick Thornton (Samson and Delilah) in the cast; and University of Newcastle Lecturer in Communications Jane Shadbolt’s animation, The Cartographer, a film about the limits of mapping which has already won two of the inaugural Australian Production Design Guild Awards.

Flickerfest’s Short Film Showcases include Short Bites of Horror, World of Wacky Animation and From the Oscars—with the Oscars Shorts & Animation Governor, Jon Bloom, showing the best of the Academy Award winning shorts. Post-festival the best from the 2012 Flickerfest will tour to an astonishing 34 cities and regional centres, from Byron Bay to Broome. RT


Flickerfest, 21st Australian International Short Film Festival, Bondi Pavillion, Sydney, Jan 6-15, touring nationally Jan-May, flickerfest.com.au

RealTime issue #106 Dec-Jan 2011 pg. 20

© RealTime ; for permission to reproduce apply to realtime@realtimearts.net

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